December 7, 2021

Best fitness Tracker

a Healthy Lifestyle for a Better Future

2 min read

Ingrown nails are common, and most people experience them. While it can be treated at home, you will have to consult a doctor if you experience extreme pain and discomfort in your ingrown nail.

If you are dealing with an ingrown toenail in Bakersfield, you must consult a doctor at the earliest. Seeking professional help will help you eliminate the risk of any further complications.

When do you need to see a doctor?

  • You feel continuous pain in and around your toenail. 
  • It is becoming unbreakable and is affecting your skin around it.
  • There is extreme sensitivity, and you are unable to wear your shoes.
  • You feel that the nail is putting pressure on your skin.
  • You can see a wound that has been created by the cutting of the nail in your skin. This wound can easily get infected and can also reach your bones. 
  • People with chronic diseases like diabetes are at risk as they cannot feel any pain and have weak immune systems. 

Your toenail infection can rapidly increase from minor to major, and it is best advised that you avoid any risks and consult a doctor.

How do doctors treat ingrown toenails?

  1. Check for possible infections: As soon as you consult a doctor to treat your ingrown toenail, he will first check for any infections. If there are signs, he will provide you with appropriate antibiotics for a few weeks. Since patients with diabetes are at a higher risk, the doctor will be extra careful. 
  1. Remove the ingrown edge: The next thing your doctor will do is perform a quick removal in which he will remove the ingrown nail. It is a simple procedure wherein local anesthesia is given to you. You will see and feel an incredible amount of improvement as soon as the process ends. Furthermore, it is a painless procedure and is done in just a couple of hours.

When the doctor removes the ingrown edge, he also eliminates the nail matrix. This means that the part will never grow back again. 

Aftercare of your toenail:

Your doctor will put a bandage on your toenail after the procedure. In addition to this, he will also give you a few aftercare instructions like how many times you have to change the bandage and if there are any sports activities that you must avoid. He might also suggest you a few home remedies like soaking your toe in warm water.

Consulting a doctor is essential as they can provide instant pain relief and lower any signs of infections. Therefore even if your ingrown toenail looks minor, show it to your trusted doctor and get appropriate treatments.… Read More...

3 min read

Three generations, (from left to right) grandmother Genoveva Calloway, daughter Petra Gonzales, and granddaughter Vanesa Quintero, live next door to each other in San Pablo, Calif. Recently their extended family was hit with a second wave of COVID infections a year after the first.

Beth LaBerge/KQED


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Beth LaBerge/KQED


Three generations, (from left to right) grandmother Genoveva Calloway, daughter Petra Gonzales, and granddaughter Vanesa Quintero, live next door to each other in San Pablo, Calif. Recently their extended family was hit with a second wave of COVID infections a year after the first.

Beth LaBerge/KQED

On a Friday afternoon in early October this year, 8-year-old Maricia Redondo came home from her third grade class in the San Francisco Bay Area with puffy eyes, a runny nose and a cough.

“On Saturday morning we both got tested,” says Vanessa Quintero, Maricia’s 31-year-old mother. “Our results came back Monday that we were both positive.”

Vanessa stared at her phone in shock and called her doctor’s test-result hotline again, in disbelief. “This is wrong,” she thought. “I hung up and dialed again. It’s positive. This is wrong. I hung up again. And then I did it again!”

She was freaking out for two reasons. First, her large, extended family had already fought a harrowing battle against COVID-19 last year — in the fall of 2020. The virus had traveled fast and furious through their working class neighborhood back then, in the East Bay city of San Pablo. Four generations of Vanessa’s family live next door to each other in three different houses there, all connected by a backyard.

Vanessa was also terrified because she couldn’t fathom another round of treatment against a more dangerous variant than she’d faced before. The pandemic has disproportionately struck Latino families across the United States, and delta is currently the predominant variant in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s twice as contagious and may cause more severe illnesses than previous variants in unvaccinated people.

The family’s bad luck was uncanny. Research suggests immunity against a natural infection lasts about a year. And here it was almost exactly the same time of year and the family was fighting COVID-19 again.

“Reinfection is a thing,” says Dr. Peter Chin-Hong, a specialist in infections diseases and professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “It probably manifests itself more when the variant in town looks different enough from the previous variants. Or enough time has elapsed since you first got it, [and] immunity has waned.” He says a second infection is still not common, but doctors are starting to see more cases.

Computer models in a recent study suggest that people who have been infected by the virus can expect a reinfection within a year or two if they do not wear a mask or receive a vaccination. The findings show that the risk of a second bout rises over time. A person has a 5% chance

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2 min read

Source: Courtney Lynch / Android Central

If you’re like me and you’ve tried a fair share of fitness trackers and smartwatches, you know that many of them are similar in lots of ways. However, the main thing to understand about the new Whoop 4.0 is that it’s not a typical fitness tracker.

If you’re familiar with the Whoop 3.0, then you probably have a good idea of what I’m talking about. There’s no display on the tracker itself, so you won’t be interacting with the device on your wrist. On that note, you don’t have to wear the Whoop 4.0 on your wrist if you don’t want to. The Whoop Body collection lets you insert the sensor into a technical garment such as a bralette, leggings, or performance top.

VPN Deals: Lifetime license for $16, monthly plans at $1 & more

Users who are accustomed to fitness trackers that count their steps might be disappointed. However, Whoop has provided a lengthy explanation as to why steps aren’t counted. As you can see, the Whoop 4.0 is a totally different perspective than what you’ll find on most other fitness trackers.

Depending on your point of view, this can either be really fun and innovative or a bit odd and difficult to adjust to. If you’re someone who prefers to interact with your device and you don’t need highly detailed tracking, the Whoop 4.0 might not appeal to you. However, for elite athletes that may benefit from advanced metrics such as performance, strain, and recovery, then the Whoop 4.0 might be your golden ticket to improving your training routine.


Whoop 4

Whoop 4.0

Bottom line: If you’ve been waiting for a tracker that’s focused on helping you monitor and improve your workout routine, the Whoop 4.0 just might impress you. You’ll receive data that helps you better understand your overall performance and the factors affecting it. There’s no display or extra perks, so it’s not meant to be fashionable or to function like a smartwatch. Some of the data might be too advanced for some users who just want basic tracking.

The Good

  • In-depth tracking and metrics
  • Significantly slimmer design
  • Very comfortable to wear
  • Plenty of band options
  • Compatible with Whoop Body

The Bad

  • Short battery life
  • Difficult to swap bands
  • No “extra” features
  • Subscription required

Whoop 4.0: Price and availability

Whoop 4 sensor

Source: Courtney Lynch / Android Central

The Whoop 4.0 was announced on Sep. 8, 2021, and went on sale shortly after. There are a few different membership options depending on your preferences. You can pay upfront for an 18-month membership that costs $18 per month, or if you prefer an annual membership, you can opt for a monthly subscription, which costs $24 per month. Those who don’t want a long commitment can opt for a six-month membership, which will cost $30 per month.

Whoop 4.0: What you’ll like

Whoop 4 strap

Source: Courtney Lynch / Android Central

No one likes a bulky fitness tracker that gets in the way of your workouts. Fortunately,

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3 min read

With the nation’s health and fitness treatment program strained by the pandemic, veterans with medical techniques say pink tape stops them from making use of their armed service credentials to qualify for civilian positions.



A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Pandemic has been straining the U.S. health and fitness treatment program. There’s a small provide of nurses and a high amount of burnout immediately after dealing with the disaster for practically two many years. There is what would appear to be like a purely natural pool of labor to draw from however – army veterans with health care coaching. But as Quil Lawrence studies, pink tape is holding several vets from turning their armed forces knowledge into a civilian health care task.

QUIL LAWRENCE, BYLINE: Supplying lifesaving aid less than annoying conditions is the position description for a battle medic like Tim Hobbs.

TIM HOBBS: I did two deployments to Afghanistan, two to Iraq and then I did a humanitarian mission in Puerto Rico just after Hurricane Maria.

LAWRENCE: Hobbs later supervised army healthcare clinics, another a great deal-needed talent. When he received out, his 20 several years of military qualifications did not translate.

HOBBS: Realistically, I’m only qualified to generate an ambulance, administer oxygen and help with possibly oral glucose or a individual getting nitroglycerin. That’s it.

LAWRENCE: Which he thinks is nuts, especially with a pandemic on.

HOBBS: I comprehend that you will find legal troubles. You can find all types of red tape that I am almost certainly, you know, not aware of. But I do imagine it really is pretty outrageous.

LAWRENCE: Veterans have been increasing this concern for years. Dan Goldenberg, with the Call of Duty Endowment, states a review this thirty day period located that it is really however a issue.

DAN GOLDENBERG: Every single medic and clinic corpsman gets much more than $100,000 really worth of original education in the discipline and then several years of experience. And nevertheless when they go away the assistance, in several cases, they are not able to trip in the back again of an ambulance. And that’s just a large dropped chance.

LAWRENCE: The study took the illustration of EMTs – unexpected emergency medical technicians. Any army medic should really be currently skilled for the work. But Goldenberg suggests nationwide, only 6 states make it simple for medics to become EMTs. 10 states make them start off school all over once again, which include California, which has the most veterans in the place.

GOLDENBERG: But, you know, we estimate that somewhere between 30- and 50,000 former medics and corpsman are out there. And, you know, they wished to do the job in the field, and they have not been ready to get the obtain, which was sort of stunning to us, in particular in the midst of a pandemic.

LAWRENCE: Goldenberg says 22 states have beautifully great guidelines to accept armed forces qualifications, but they really don’t connect it evidently.

GOLDENBERG: So it really is pretty unclear to interested medics

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2 min read

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William Stork of Cedar Hill, Missouri, is delaying a surgical tooth extraction in the hope that Congress will add a dental benefit to Medicare as part of President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better legislative package. The public insurance program for people 65 and older has excluded dental (and vision and hearing) coverage since its inception in 1965.

Kaiser Health News

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William Stork needs a tooth out. That’s what the 71-year-old retired truck driver’s dentist told him during a recent checkup.

That kind of extraction requires an oral surgeon, which could cost him around $1,000 because, like most seniors, Stork does not have dental insurance, and Medicare won’t cover his dental bills. Between Social Security and his pension from the Teamsters union, Stork said, he lives comfortably in Cedar Hill, Missouri, about 30 miles southwest of St. Louis. But that cost is significant enough that he’s decided to wait until the tooth absolutely must come out.

Nearly half of seniors didn’t visit dentist — rates higher for Blacks, Hispanics

Stork’s predicament is at the heart of a long-simmering rift within the dental profession that has reemerged as a battle over how to add dental coverage to Medicare, the public insurance program for people 65 and older — if a benefit can pass at all.

Health equity advocates see President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better agenda as a once-in-a-generation opportunity to provide dental coverage to those on Medicare, nearly half of whom did not visit a dentist in 2018, well before the pandemic paused dental appointments for many. The rates were even higher for Black (68%), Hispanic (61%) and low-income (73%) seniors.

The coverage was left out of a new framework announced by President Biden, but proponents still hope they can get the coverage in a final agreement. Complicating their push is a debate over how many of the nation’s more than 60 million Medicare beneficiaries should receive it.

Champions for covering everyone on Medicare find themselves up against an unlikely adversary: the American Dental Association, which is backing an alternative plan to give dental benefits only to low-income Medicare recipients.

Medicare has excluded dental (and vision and hearing) coverage since its inception in 1965. That exclusion was by design: The dental profession has long fought to keep itself separate from the traditional medical system.

READ NEXT: Drug costs are of control on Medicare — especially insulin. This proposal could help.

More recently, however, dentists have stressed the link between oral and overall health. Most infamously, the 2007 death of a 12-year-old boy that might have been prevented by an $80 tooth extraction prompted changes to Maryland’s version of Medicaid, the federal-state public insurance program for low-income people.

But researchers have also, for example, linked dental care with reduced healthcare spending in patients with Type 2 diabetes. When the World Health Organization suggested delaying

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