August 11, 2022

Best fitness Tracker

a Healthy Lifestyle for a Better Future

debt

2 min read

Jeni Rae Peters and daughter embrace at their home in Rapid City, S.D. In 2020, Peters was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. After treatment, Peters estimates that her medical bills exceeded $30,000.

Dawnee LeBeau for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

Dawnee LeBeau for NPR


Jeni Rae Peters and daughter embrace at their home in Rapid City, S.D. In 2020, Peters was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. After treatment, Peters estimates that her medical bills exceeded $30,000.

Dawnee LeBeau for NPR

RAPID CITY, S.D. ― Jeni Rae Peters would make promises to herself as she lay awake nights after being diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago.

“My kids had lost so much,” said Peters, a single mom and mental health counselor. She had just adopted two girls and was fostering four other children. “I swore I wouldn’t force them to have yet another parent.”

Multiple surgeries, radiation, and chemotherapy controlled the cancer. But, despite having insurance, Peters was left with more than $30,000 of debt, threats from bill collectors, and more anxious nights thinking of her kids.

“Do I pull them out of day care? Do I stop their schooling and tutoring? Do I not help them with college?” Peters asked herself. “My doctor saved my life, but my medical bills are stealing from my children’s lives.”

Cancer kills about 600,000 people in the U.S. every year, making it a leading cause of death. Many more survive it, because of breakthroughs in medicines and therapies.

But the high costs of modern-day care have left millions with a devastating financial burden. That’s forced patients and their families to make gut-wrenching sacrifices even as they confront a grave illness, according to a KHN-NPR investigation of America’s sprawling medical debt problem. The project shows few suffer more than those with cancer.

About two-thirds of adults with health care debt who’ve had cancer themselves or in their family have cut spending on food, clothing, or other household basics, a poll conducted by KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation) for this project found. About 1 in 4 have declared bankruptcy or lost their home to eviction or foreclosure.

Other research shows that patients from minority communities are more likely to experience financial hardships caused by cancer than white patients, reinforcing racial disparities that shadow the U.S. health care system.

“It’s crippling,” said Dr. Veena Shankaran, a University of Washington oncologist who began studying the financial impact of cancer after seeing patients ruined by medical bills. “Even if someone survives the cancer, they often can’t shake the debt.”

Shankaran found that cancer patients were 71% more likely than Americans without the disease to have bills in collections, face tax liens and mortgage foreclosure, or experience other financial setbacks. Analyzing bankruptcy records and cancer registries in Washington state, Shankaran and other researchers also discovered that cancer patients were 2½ times more likely to declare bankruptcy than those without the disease.

And cancer patients who went bankrupt were more likely to die than those who did not.

Read More...
2 min read

How to get rid of medical debt — or avoid it in the first place

Patients and the consumer advocates say there are things people should do to try to avoid, or navigate, the medical debt trap. Financial assistance is available, but it all requires self-advocacy.

Lori Mangum was 32 when apple-sized tumors sprouted on her head. Now — six years and 10 surgeries later — the skin cancer is gone. But her pain lives on, in the form of medical debt.

Even with insurance, Mangum paid $36,000 out-of-pocket, charges that stemmed from the hospital, the surgeon, the anesthesiologist, the pharmacy, and follow-up care. And she still has about $7,000 more to pay.

While she was trying to manage her treatment and medical costs, Mangum remembers thinking, “I should be able to figure this out. I should be able to do this for myself.”

But medical billing and health insurance systems in the U.S. are complex, and many patients have difficulty navigating them.

“It’s incredibly humbling — and sometimes even to the point of humiliating — to feel like you have no idea what to do,” Mangum said.

If you’re worried about incurring debt during a health crisis or are struggling to deal with bills you already have, you’re not alone. Some 100 million people — including 41% of U.S. adults — have health care debt, according to a recent survey by KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation).

But you can inform and protect yourself. NPR and KHN spoke with patients, consumer advocates, and researchers to glean their hard-won insights on how to avoid or manage medical debt.

“It shouldn’t be on the patients who are experiencing the medical issues to navigate this complicated system,” said Nicolas Cordova, a health care lawyer with the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty. But consumers who inform themselves have a better chance of avoiding debt traps.

That means knowing the ins and outs of various policies — whether it’s your insurance coverage, or a hospital’s financial assistance program, or a state’s consumer protection laws. Ask a lot of questions and persist. “Don’t take ‘no’ for an answer,” said Cordova, “because sometimes you might get a ‘yes’.”

Even people with health insurance can land in debt; indeed, one of the biggest problems, consumer advocates said, is that so many people are underinsured, which means they can get hit with huge out-of-pocket costs from coinsurance and high deductibles.

Here is some practical advice about facing down medical debt, at every stage of care and after.

Before You Get Care

Get familiar with your insurance coverage and out-of-pocket costs

Get the best insurance coverage you can afford — even when you’re healthy. Make sure you know what the copays, coinsurance, and deductibles will be. Don’t hesitate to call the insurer and ask someone to walk you through all the potential out-of-pocket costs. Keep in mind that you cannot make changes to your policy except during certain windows of time, such as open enrollment (typically in the fall or early winter) or after a major life event.

Sign up for public insurance if you qualify

If you’re uninsured but need health care, you might qualify for

Read More...
2 min read

Soon after recently overhauling a “glitch” in the Economical Treatment Act (ACA), the Biden administration is now addressing an additional situation plaguing the American well being care technique: health care personal debt.

On Monday, Vice President Kamala Harris introduced the administration’s 4-action prepare aimed at increasing buyer protections for Us citizens billed for health and fitness treatment prices.

These measures consist of keeping clinical vendors and credit card debt collectors “accountable for hazardous techniques,” decreasing the purpose health care financial debt performs in identifying no matter if People can accessibility credit rating, forgiving professional medical debt for in excess of 500,000 low-earnings veterans, and informing individuals of their legal rights.

“No 1 in our country must have to go bankrupt just to get the health treatment they will need,” Vice President Harris mentioned.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about the Economical Care Act, Medicaid, and clinical personal debt at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 5, 2022. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Professional medical financial debt ‘not like other varieties of debt’

According to a February 2022 report from the Consumer Financial Defense Bureau (CFPB), U.S. shoppers held $88 billion in personal debt as of June 2021. Moreover, the report located that health-related personal debt accounts for 58% of all third-bash selection tradelines (i.e., the credit accounts detailed on a credit report).

The report highlighted that Black and Hispanic folks are extra probably to have health-related debt, alongside with young adults and small-profits individuals.

“This stress is not shouldered equally in America,” Overall health and Human Providers Secretary Xavier Becerra mentioned, incorporating: “It is a unpleasant truth … this is not just about health and fitness treatment. It truly is about economic security.”

Before long after the CFPB findings were being introduced, a few of the most important credit history unions — Equifax (EFX), Experian (EXPGF), and TransUnion (TRU) — stated that commencing July 1, they will no longer include clinical personal debt in collections on credit rating reviews once it is compensated off. And commencing in 2023, professional medical personal debt in collection which is considerably less than $500 will be excluded from credit score reviews. Also, the grace period of time for healthcare credit card debt assortment has been expanded from six months to one particular calendar year.

Vice President Harris attends an event in the Rose Garden of the White House April 11, 2022. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Vice President Harris attends an function in the Rose Yard of the White Property April 11, 2022. (Image by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The Biden administration highlighted that the $500 debt exclusion only applies to a fraction of Individuals in want, which even now leaves millions of Us residents guiding.

“Medical credit card debt is not like other varieties of personal debt,” Brian Deese, director of the White Residence Nationwide Economic Council, stated on Yahoo Finance Live (movie over). “In just about all cases, most cases, you never choose to acquire it on. It comes about when you have a wellbeing function happen in your life. And medical personal debt is not a incredibly fantastic predictor of potential credit rating good

Read More...
2019 Copyright © All rights reserved. | Newsphere by AF themes.