May 23, 2022

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TYLER, Texas (KLTV) – Equally doctors shot in a Smith County dental office incident have died, according to the sheriff’s business.

The adult males ended up shot by Steven Alexander Smith, 40, who is billed with capital murder, in accordance to sheriff’s office environment spokesman Larry Christian. Smith is held on a total of $3 million bond.

Steven Alexander Smith is held on a full of $3M bond.(Smith County Sheriff’s Business office)

The sheriff’s office states the victims are Dr. Blake G. Sinclair, 59, of Tyler, and Dr. Jack E. Burroughs, 75, of Tyler.

At about 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, the Smith County Sheriff’s Office environment acquired a 911 contact about a capturing at Economical Dentures, positioned at 3081 Hwy 31 East close to Tyler. Upon the arrival of deputies, two male victims had been positioned within just the organization suffering from gunshot wounds.

The first investigation disclosed that Smith was a affected individual at the clinic. He grew to become offended at clinic employees and retreated to his pickup, positioned in the parking whole lot. He then returned and entered into the lobby region in which he was satisfied by clinic staff. Smith had a handgun and in the long run shot two physicians who had been functioning inside of the small business, according to the sheriff’s workplace.

“He was not happy with the excellent of operate performed on the dentures that he experienced been equipped with,” Sheriff Larry Smith claimed.

Equally victims ended up taken to a Tyler medical center. Smith was later on arrested at a property in south Tyler.

Witness to capturing said she hid guiding lobby wall

Sheriff Larry Smith reported the two victims died quickly right after arriving at the hospital.

Steven Smith is also billed with aggravated assault. That demand stems from the suspect for pointing the gun at a nurse, who pleaded with him, stating she experienced small children.

“And there is no way for us know he meant to shoot her or not, but she pleaded with him that she had a kid,” Sheriff Smith reported. “So he didn’t shoot her but he did point the pistol at her.”

Sheriff Smith reported a fast-pondering employee took a photograph of the suspect’s license plate, which was presented to a first-arriving deputy. The deputy sent that facts together to dispatch, enabling authorities to observe down the deputy’s handle. A deputy arrived just as the suspect was arriving at the residence in south Tyler, Sheriff Smith mentioned.

The man’s mothers and fathers have been inside of the household, but came out immediately after becoming persuaded to be negotiators. Then they convinced the suspect to come out a handful of minutes afterwards.

Authorities observed two handguns in the household, which were being the exact caliber as the gun applied in the taking pictures, Sheriff Smith mentioned.

Sheriff Smith claimed the two medical doctors ended up observed inside of the right doorway, about 15 toes or so inside of. The sheriff also said he thinks the

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CNN
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After the Omicron coronavirus variant made a record number of US children sick in January, children’s hospitals across the United States braced for what has come with every other spike in the Covid-19 pandemic: cases of a rare but dangerous condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, commonly known as MIS-C. But a number of hospitals say the expected surge in cases hasn’t showed up – at least not yet.

MIS-C can follow Covid-19 even some weeks after infection. It can cause parts of the body to become inflamed, and it can affect major organs including the kidneys, brain, lungs and heart.

MIS-C symptoms are not uniform but may involve abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, conjunctivitis and low blood pressure. It often follows a mild or even asymptomatic case of Covid-19.

With the Omicron variant causing so many illnesses, it wasn’t clear exactly how many MIS-C cases hospitals could expect or how serious they would be. Research is still underway, but health care providers at many major children’s hospitals describe the outcomes as “a mixed bag.”

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tracks MIS-C cases but updates the numbers on its website only once a month. There have been 6,851 cases reported during the pandemic, with 59 deaths, as of January 31.

That’s a tiny fraction of child Covid cases. More than 12.3 million children have been sick with Covid since the start of the pandemic, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ analysis of data from the states that report cases, hospitalizations and deaths by age.

The more contagious Omicron variant brought a flood of cases: Almost 4.5 million children have had Covid just since the beginning of January.

Different regions of the country are still at different points in the Omicron wave, and it will take some time before scientists have a clearer picture of what the variant has meant for MIS-C cases overall.

Most MIS-C cases have not been fatal, but just last week, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported that a 10-year-old from the southeast part of the state died within the past month from MIS-C.

Tom Haupt, a respiratory disease epidemiologist with the department, said Friday that the state puts a priority on having doctors report even suspected cases of MIS-C so state officials can then report them to the CDC as quickly as possible.

“We want to share this information with the CDC with hopes that we can ultimately find out what’s causing this and what we could do to further prevent MIS-C,” Haupt said.

There are several MIS-C studies underway across the country. Scientists are still trying to figure out why some kids get it and others don’t. They’re also trying to understand the long-term consequences and the best way to treat it.

One thing is certain about MIS-C: “It always follows the same pattern,” said Dr. Roberta DeBiasi, Infectious Disease Division chief at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, DC. “It’s always two to six weeks after

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Humber River Hospital’s Intensive Care Unit, in Toronto, Canada, on April 28, 2020. COLE BURSTON/Getty Images
  • An observational study examined data from around 34,000 physicians in Ottawa, Canada.
  • Researchers found physicians participated in nearly 26% more mental health and substance use visits during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the year prior.
  • The study team believes the increase is attributable to both increased stressors during the pandemic and additional access to mental health services through virtual outpatient options.

There is no denying the fact the COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on the mental health of people worldwide. A recent study found the pandemic increased cases of major depressive disorder by 53 million and anxiety disorders by 76 million globally.

But for those working on the front lines of the pandemic — such as healthcare workers — how has the situation affected their mental health?

A team of researchers from the University of Ottawa Department of Family Medicine and The Ottawa Hospital in Canada is helping answer that question. Their new study has found a link between the pandemic and the number of outpatient healthcare visits physicians participated in for mental health and substance use concerns.

Researchers believe their study results will help shed light on the need for increased mental health services for the medical community.

The results from this population-based cohort study appear in JAMA Open Network.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, studies showed an elevated rate of mental health issues among healthcare workers. One such study in 2015 found resident physicians were at high risk for depression. Another study in 2018 examined burnout among United States healthcare professionals, finding over one-half of physicians and one-third of nurses had symptoms affecting their mental health.

Interestingly, other studies have linked higher levels of substance misuse issues to healthcare professionals. According to American Addiction Centers, approximately 4.4% of medical workers have a problem with heavy alcohol consumption. And about 5.5% of healthcare personnel experience illicit drug use.

Dr. Daniel Myran, a family physician, public health and preventive medicine specialist, and postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ottawa Department of Family Medicine and The Ottawa Hospital, is the lead author of this current study.

According to him, multiple surveys have found high levels of mental distress in healthcare workers, including physicians, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“However, because these surveys generally look at one or two points in time, it limits our understanding of whether these concerning rates of mental distress reflect a worsening during COVID-19 or reflect pre-pandemic baselines,” Dr. Myran told Medical News Today. “In addition, most surveys have low response rates, which raises concerns that their results may not represent the overall mental health of physicians.”

The team addressed this by taking an alternative approach, looking at changes in mental health care-related visits that physicians made during the pandemic. “Because we were able to follow mental health visits before and during the pandemic, we were able to quantify how visits

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Leslie Clayton, a physician assistant in Minnesota, says a name change for her profession is long overdue. “We don’t assist,” she says. “We provide care as part of a team.”

Liam James Doyle for KHN


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Liam James Doyle for KHN


Leslie Clayton, a physician assistant in Minnesota, says a name change for her profession is long overdue. “We don’t assist,” she says. “We provide care as part of a team.”

Liam James Doyle for KHN

After 23 years as a physician assistant, Leslie Clayton remains rankled by one facet of her vocation: its title. Specifically, the word “assistant.”

Patients have asked if she’s heading to medical school or in the middle of it. The term confounded even her family, she says: It took years for her parents to understand she does more than take blood pressure and perform similar basic tasks.

“There is an assumption that there has to be some sort of direct, hands-on oversight for us to do our work, and that’s not been accurate for decades,” says Clayton, who practices at a clinic in Golden Valley, Minn. “We don’t assist. We provide care as part of a team.”

Seeking greater understanding for and appreciation of their profession, physician assistants are pushing to rebrand themselves as “physician associates.” Their national group formally replaced “assistant” with “associate” in its name in May, transforming into the American Academy of Physician Associates. The group hopes state legislatures and regulatory bodies will legally enshrine the name change in statutes and rules. The total cost of the campaign, which began in 2018, will reach nearly $22 million, according to a consulting firm hired by the association.

Doctors are pushing back

But rechristening the PA name has spiked the blood pressure of physicians, who complain that some patients will wrongly assume a “physician associate” is a junior doctor — much as an attorney who has not yet made partner is an associate. The head of the American Medical Association has warned that the change “will undoubtedly confuse patients and is clearly an attempt to advance their pursuit toward independent practice.” The American Osteopathic Association, another group that represents doctors, accused PAs and other nonphysician clinicians of trying “to obfuscate their credentials through title misappropriation.”

In medicine, seemingly innocuous title changes are inflamed by the unending turf wars between various levels of practitioners who jealously guard their professional prerogatives and the kind of care they are authorized to perform. Just this year, the National Conference of State Legislatures catalogued 280 bills introduced in statehouses to modify scope-of-practice laws that set the practice boundaries of nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists, paramedics, dental hygienists, optometrists and addiction counselors.

Lawmakers allowed North Carolina dental hygienists to administer local anesthetics; permitted Wyoming optometrists — who, unlike ophthalmologists, do not attend medical school — to use lasers and perform surgeries in certain circumstances; and authorized Arkansas certified nurse practitioners to practice independently. Meanwhile, the physicians’ lobby aggressively fights these kinds of proposals in state legislatures, accusing other

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