May 19, 2024

Best fitness Tracker

a Healthy Lifestyle for a Better Future

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2 min read

Priscilla Serrano did everything she could to keep her child’s teeth clean and healthy. She rubbed his gums twice a day with a finger brush when he was 3 months old. She brought him to the dentist before his first birthday. She weaned him off a bottle early, gave him healthful snacks, avoided juice, brushed his teeth twice a day, and even flossed for him.

But despite her best efforts, Daniel still developed two cavities before his 6th birthday.

“I was kind of devastated. You work so hard to prevent any of this, and then you see your child in pain,” said Serrano of Long Beach. “I was in denial at first. I was like, ‘No, I did a good job.’ But I finally accepted.”

At the time of year described by dentists as the scary season for teeth — a Halloween holiday laden with sticky, sugary treats — children’s dental care takes on a sense of renewed urgency. The stakes couldn’t be higher in California, where the health of little teeth is sobering.

A dental hygienist holds open the mouth of a stuffed animal so a young boy can learn good teeth brushing habits.

Dental hygienist Elizabeth Valdivia, right, holds a stuffed animal so that Armani Allen, 2, can learn good teeth brushing habits as he his held by his mother, Nicole Nelson, at the Children’s Dental Health Clinic in Long Beach.

(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

California ranks among the worst states when it comes to pediatric dental disease. A national survey from 2020-21 found that 14.8% of the state’s children ages 1 to 17 had decayed teeth or cavities in the past 12 months studied — ranking 47th out of 51 among all the states and the District of Columbia.

“We’re really pushing for prevention because we don’t want to go down the line of having cavities, oral pain, possible infection and spread of infection,” said Dr. Abrey Daniel, a dentist with the Oral Health Program at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. “Sometimes parents may just do a quick brush and not even notice that cavities are forming.”

Nationwide, more than half of children develop cavities by the age of 8, usually because of poor nutrition, bad hygiene habits or a lack of dental care. Other factors include drinking water without fluoride, inadequate saliva flow and genetics; even a child with good dental habits can develop cavities.

As with so many health issues, children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families are most at risk. The California Department of Public Health’s 2018-19 Smile Survey of third-graders found that children from communities of color and Spanish-speaking households are more likely to experience tooth decay. Latino children had the highest rates, with 72% having experienced some sort of tooth decay, compared with 40% of white children. Black children had the highest rate of untreated decay at 26% — almost twice the rate of white children.

Throughout the state, many low-income children have limited access to dental care, fresh fruits and vegetables, and fluoridated tap water, said Dr. Ryan Huang, the dental director at the South

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2 min read

Working 1,000 miles about the class of 4 yrs may well seem to be like a overwhelming problem – notably for folks who have not laced up their sneakers for a exercise routine in a even though. But exercise gurus say it is completely doable.

To encourage people to undertake more healthy life – and to celebrate America’s forthcoming 250th birthday – Independence Blue Cross has established a new conditioning problem, “Highway to 2026.” It asks members to wander, hike, run or wheel 1,000 miles by July 4, 2026. Participants also can decide on to bicycle 10,000 miles. 

The problem is broken into 4 250-mile segments (or 2,500-mile segments for cyclists). People who track their miles on the web and full every single of the 4 milestones will get medals and be entered to get various prizes. Any one age 18 or older can sign-up

Fitness experts recommend men and women who do not at this time adhere to physical exercise routines to commence bit by bit and slowly raise the mileage of their workouts. Here is what that should really seem like.

How to start instruction

The goal for men and women who are just beginning to perform out constantly is gradual development, according to Dr. Charlie Seltzer, a Philadelphia-dependent doctor with board certifications in being overweight and inside medicine. 

“You are not able to make major progress in 1 day, but you can harm by yourself substantially in one working day,” Seltzer discussed.

For men and women looking for to participant in the “Road to 2026” problem, it is crucial to decide which form of training they want to total and to set specific but real looking targets, Seltzer claimed. When men and women push too difficult as well swiftly, they maximize the danger of overuse injuries like tension fractures, shin splints and Achilles tendonitis.

Persons who get pleasure from walking must at first set a bar of walking 10 minutes three situations a week, Seltzer mentioned. Then they should add five minutes every other week.

Regardless of what plan a person sets, it requirements to be sensible, Seltzer reported. Remaining in a position to regularly exercising two times a 7 days for 20 minutes is much better than scheduling to comprehensive five hour-extensive workout routines every single 7 days, but getting not able to adhere with it.

“Have a program prepared out rather of just winging it,” he added. “You can normally improve it. You have to know what you are undertaking to know if it is operating.”

Chris Beck, head coach at B3 Fitness in Philadelphia, advised pursuing the 10-15% rule. “If you walk four miles the very first 7 days, then maximize your mileage by 10-15% just about every week. You want to slowly improve your mileage so you do not put as well significantly worry on the physique.”

Beck advised people today to aim on raising their endurance to start with in advance of upping the depth of their exercise sessions. 

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3 min read

American Medical Association President Dr. Jack Resneck recently recounted how doctors around the country are facing difficulties practicing medicine in states that ban abortion.

Nicole Xu for NPR


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Nicole Xu for NPR


American Medical Association President Dr. Jack Resneck recently recounted how doctors around the country are facing difficulties practicing medicine in states that ban abortion.

Nicole Xu for NPR

Since Roe v. Wade was overturned, 13 states have banned abortion except in the case of a medical emergency or serious health risk for the pregnant patient. But deciding what cases qualify for a medical exception can be a difficult judgement call for doctors.

News reports and court affidavits have documented how health care workers sometimes deny women abortion procedures in emergency situations – including NPR’s story of a woman who was initially not treated for her miscarriage at an Ohio ER, though she’d been bleeding profusely for hours.

In Missouri, hospital doctors told a woman whose water broke at 18 weeks that “current Missouri law supersedes our medical judgment” and so she could not receive an abortion procedure even though she was at risk of infection, according to a report in the Springfield News-Leader.

That hospital is now under investigation for violating a federal law that requires doctors to treat and stabilize patients during a medical emergency.

And a survey by the Texas Policy Evaluation Project found clinicians sometimes avoided standard abortion procedures, opting instead for “hysterotomy, a surgical incision into the uterus, because it might not be construed as an abortion.”

“That’s just nuts,” Dr. Matthew Wynia says. He’s a physician who directs the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado. “[A hysterotomy is] much more dangerous, much more risky – the woman may never have another pregnancy now because you’re trying to avoid being accused of having conducted an abortion.”

Reports like these prompted Wynia to publish an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine in September, calling for physicians and leading medical institutions to take a stand against these laws through “professional civil disobedience.” The way he sees it, no doctor should opt to do a procedure that may harm their patient – or delay or deny care – because of the fear of prosecution.

“I have seen some very disturbing quotes from health professionals essentially saying, ‘Look, it’s the law. We have to live within the law,'” he says. “If the law is wrong and causing you to be involved in harming patients, you do not have to live [within] that law.”

These issues have raised a growing debate in medicine about what to do in the face of laws that many doctors feel force them into ethical quandaries.

Medical organizations raise the issue

At the American Medical Association’s November meeting, president Dr. Jack Resneck gave an address to the organization’s legislative body, and recounted how doctors around the country have run into difficulty practicing medicine in states that ban abortion.

“I never imagined colleagues would find

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2 min read

Heidi Strehl worked as a pharmacy technician at a Rite Aid in the Pittsburgh suburbs for more than 16 years. She loved her customers, enjoyed her job and thought of her co-workers as family. But this fall, Strehl abruptly quit, walking out in the middle of a shift — one of many in a wave of pharmacy technicians who are doing the same.

Most of the people behind pharmacy counters who count pills and fill medication bottles are pharmacy technicians, not pharmacists — low-wage workers in positions that don’t require college degrees. Working in a pharmacy was always fast-paced, Strehl said, but in recent years the workload and stress had increased to unsustainable levels, while staffing and pay failed to keep up. During the coronavirus pandemic, the pace quickened further, especially once pharmacies began giving Covid-19 vaccine shots. Her store regularly ran behind on prescriptions, often with several hundred waiting to be filled each morning.

“It got to the point that it was just such an unsafe working environment, where you are being pulled a thousand different directions at any given time,” she said. “You’re far more likely to make a mistake and far less likely to catch it.” 

The last straws for her came in October. Strehl said she got an “insulting” 25-cent raise, bringing her to $15.08 an hour. A few days later, after yet another customer yelled at her over a delayed prescription, she had a panic attack in a corner of the pharmacy, crying and struggling to breathe while work continued around her. Then she grabbed her things, hugged her co-workers and walked out for the last time. 

Heidi Strehl with her husband and children in 2020.Ashley Costanzo

“I always thought I would retire from that place,” Strehl said. “But all of the parts of my job that I truly enjoyed over the years had slowly just gone away.”

Strehl is one of about 420,000 pharmacy technicians in the U.S. Even though they aren’t highly paid — the median pay is $16.87 per hour — and often have no pre-employment medical training, they are vital to the health care system. They help pharmacists fill and check prescriptions and make sure patients get the right medication in the right amounts at the right time. Some even give vaccinations. 

In recent months, many technicians have quit, saying they’re being asked to do too much for too little pay, increasing the possibility that they will fill prescriptions improperly.

Employers, from major drugstore chains like Rite Aid, CVS and Walgreens to mom-and-pop pharmacies and even hospitals, are struggling to replace them. It’s yet another of the labor shortages that have gripped the country this year. At many drugstores, the pharmacy staff members who remain are stretched thin. The shortage has led to dayslong waits for medication, shortened pharmacy hours and some prescription errors and vaccination mix-ups — like children receiving an adult Covid-19 vaccine shot instead of a flu shot — in a business sector in which delays and

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