May 23, 2022

Best fitness Tracker

a Healthy Lifestyle for a Better Future

protect

2 min read
Share on Pinterest
The so-called green Mediterranean diet may benefit human health and the planet’s health. Vera Lair/Stocksy

People who eat a traditional Mediterranean diet have lower rates of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. But new research suggests that a “green” Mediterranean diet — which avoids all meat and provides extra greens — may be even better for human health. If the diet catches on, the benefits for planetary health could be equally impressive.

Climate scientists believe that one of the most impactful things that people can do for the environment is to reduce their consumption of meat and dairy products.

Research notes that global production of animal-based foods — including livestock feed — accounts for 57% of total greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, whereas production of plant-based foods accounts for only 29%.

Another study estimates that if everyone became vegan, this would reduce the amount of land worldwide that farmers need to grow food by 3.1 billion hectares or 76%.

In addition to cutting emissions from food production, say the authors, rewilding the freed-up land would remove around 8.1 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere every year for the next 100 years.

Of course, the idea that billions of people worldwide would voluntarily give up their steaks, sausages, and cheeseburgers simply to curb climate change may seem far-fetched.

But perhaps they would think twice if they knew how much it would benefit their own health.

Recent research suggests that people who eat little or no meat tend to have a lower risk of cancer, in particular colorectal cancer and prostate cancer in men.

Diets that combine a reduction in meat and dairy consumption with increased intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats, bring further health benefits.

People who eat a typical Mediterranean diet, for example, have a lower overall mortality rate and a lower risk not only of cancer but also cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

A series of clinical trials now suggests that eating a “green” Mediterranean diet, or green Med diet, may provide additional benefits on top of those provided by the regular Mediterranean diet.

The diet, which adds extra plant foods rich in polyphenols and aims to avoid meat completely, is also better for the planet.

“[E]liminating meat intake — beef, pork, lamb — is by far the most important single way to reduce the carbon footprint from diet,” said Dr. Meir Stampfer, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and one of the authors of the green Med studies.

“The contribution of meat to greenhouse gas emissions is enormous compared with other foods,” he told Medical News Today.

Dr. Stampfer pointed out that the total area needed for meat production includes a lot of land for growing crops to feed livestock.

So by reducing the amount of land around the world that is devoted to producing meat, the green Med diet could play a major role in the preservation

Read More...
3 min read

If you’ve needed to get tested for COVID in the last month or so, you may have found yourself searching for a bit.

The state and country have seen a surge in the demand for testing.

The spread of the Delta variant is a large part of that.

But it’s also workplaces and schools requiring negative tests for people to return. Or unvaccinated people needing to show a negative test result before then can get into a concert or travel some place.

On top of that high demand, supplies are getting held up in busy ports with large backlogs.

“What we’re seeing is a lot more stress placed upon the supply chain on a wide variety of products. We’re seeing a lot of areas there are raw material shortages. There are longer lead times on products. And a lot of those are now products that are dedicated to either testing of COVID patients or either treatment of COVID patients,” said Gary Rakes, Aspirus Vice President and Chief Supply Chain Officer.

Rakes said there are five factors that put the supply chain in the positions it’s in now.

They include shutting down the economy at the beginning of the pandemic, unprecedented demand, and congestion at ports due to a labor shortage, container shortage, and truck driver shortage once supplies actually get off the ships.

“A chain is only as strong as the weakest link. I think during this whole pandemic event, we’ve seen a lot of weaknesses in the supply chain. I think if we’ve learned any lessons, I think that we’ve learned that we need to do better as a supply chain industry and be able to solve for these things in the future so that they don’t repeat,” said Rakes.

Rake said Aspirus has been moving forward with little disruptions.

He credits that to planning and safeguards in place to protect health care systems from people who may be panic buying.

Aspirus keeps a high inventory of supply for things like this, though Rakes warns we’ve still got a long way to go before the supply chain is fixed.

“I think this is really the perfect storm that we’re seeing in our industry. I don’t believe, I think most experts believe that it’s going to get worse before it gets better. I think what we do see is that it will last for another six months or so,” he said.

Another factor putting stress on supplies is the high number of hospitalized COVID patients.

Aspirus hospitals in Wisconsin and the U.P. are averaging more than 90 patients a day.

It recently had to expand its ICU capacity because of the high number of severely ill COVID patients.

In the North Central Region of Wisconsin, daily COVID hospitalizations have been higher than 100 patients since early September.

Aspirus urges everyone to get vaccinated against COVID to prevent severe illness or death from the virus.

window.fbAsyncInit = function() { FB.init({

appId : '2853421304975755',

xfbml : true, version : 'v2.9' }); };… Read More...

2019 Copyright © All rights reserved. | Newsphere by AF themes.