June 25, 2022

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7 health care workers in Wisconsin may possibly commence their new positions at an Ascension overall health process clinic, a court docket ruled, just after their former employer tried to block them from transitioning weeks soon after they filed their discover to leave.

Three nurses and 4 radiology experts who worked at ThedaCare Regional Healthcare Heart-Neenah ended up offered new work at Ascension NE-St. Elizabeth Campus in Appleton in December, which they approved after ThedaCare declined to match Ascension’s conditions.

The seven workforce built up the majority of ThedaCare’s 11-member interventional radiology and cardiovascular group, in accordance to the New York Occasions.

In late December, they alerted ThedaCare administration to their programs to close employment on January 14, with a prepared start out day of January 24 at the Ascension medical center.

Late final week — virtually a comprehensive week soon after the employees’ conclusion day — ThedaCare submitted a movement for a short term restraining buy and injunction, inquiring a state circuit court to block the employees from transitioning to their new work. Decide Mark J. McGinnis, of Outagamie County Circuit Court, signed the restraining purchase, citing ThedaCare’s assert that the area would absence considerable healthcare if the staff left the method.

Nonetheless, soon after a listening to on Monday, McGinnis dismissed the restraining buy, permitting the staff to go on to Ascension NE-St. Elizabeth. ThedaCare’s arguments had been not sizeable enough to uphold the injunction, dominated McGinnis. The system can depend on staffing options that are presently in area to handle potential care challenges, and the area will not reward from the workers’ care if they continue to be unemployed, as they did not program to return to ThedaCare even if the injunction had been upheld, according to their testimony.

The broader situation, in which “ThedaCare argues that Ascension inappropriately team-recruited these employees,” will go forward in court, in accordance to the Appleton Post-Crescent.

“ThedaCare has only alone to blame for failing to keep a aggressive doing the job ecosystem for its clinical personnel, opting as a substitute to underpay its crucial workers and even refusing to make a matching give to these workers when given ample chance to do so,” wrote attorneys for Ascension in a brief submitted in opposition to the ThedaCare submitting.

“With this frantic, very last-moment lawsuit, ThedaCare attempts to convert its personal inadequate management into a disruptive personal crisis for anyone — any one — but alone: Ascension, this Court, and (worst of all) 7 essential wellness treatment employees who, till Friday, considered they were being starting new work opportunities on Monday morning,” they argued. “For a medical center certainly scrambling to give affected person treatment, ThedaCare’s thoroughly geared up lawsuit, crisis injunction motion, and media assertion arrived really soon right after.”

ThedaCare Regional Health-related Centre-Neenah, just outdoors of Appleton, is a stage II trauma centre, even though Ascension NE-St. Elizabeth is a amount III center, the Submit-Crescent documented. ThedaCare argued that losing so numerous employees from the same team

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3 min read

Eugene Mymrin/Getty Images

Conceptual paper illustration of human hands and coronavirus in a lab.

Eugene Mymrin/Getty Images

Kelly LaDue thought she was done with COVID-19 in the fall of 2020 after being tormented by the virus for a miserable couple of weeks.

“And then I started with really bad heart-racing with any exertion. It was weird,” says LaDue, 54, of Ontario, N.Y. “Walking up the stairs, I’d have to sit down and rest. And I was short of breath. I had to rest after everything I did.”

A year later, LaDue still feels like a wreck. She gets bad headaches and wakes up with pain all over her body on more days than not. She also experiences a sudden high-pitched whistling in her ears, bizarre phantom smells and vibrations in her legs. Her brain is so foggy most of the time that she had to quit her job as a nurse and is afraid to drive.

“These symptoms, they come and go,” she says. “You think: ‘It’s gone.’ You think: ‘This is it. I’m getting better.’ And then it’ll just rear back up again.”

Kelly LaDue, of Ontario, N.Y., was working as a nurse when she got COVID-19 and recovered. But a year later, she’s still grappling with a strange constellation of symptoms.

Kelly LaDue


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Kelly LaDue


Kelly LaDue, of Ontario, N.Y., was working as a nurse when she got COVID-19 and recovered. But a year later, she’s still grappling with a strange constellation of symptoms.

Kelly LaDue

Patients like LaDue have researchers scrambling to figure out why some people experience persistent, often debilitating symptoms after catching SARS-CoV-2. It remains unclear how often it occurs. But if only a small fraction of the hundreds of millions of people who’ve had COVID-19 are left struggling with long-term health problems, it’s a major public health problem.

“I think it’s the post-pandemic pandemic,” says Dr. Angela Cheung, who’s studying long COVID-19 at the University of Toronto. “If we are conservative and think that only 10% of patients who develop COVID-19 would get long COVID, that’s a huge number.”

“Not caused by one thing”

So far there are more theories than clear answers for what’s going on, and there is good reason to think the varied constellation of symptoms could have different causes in different people. Maybe, in some, the virus is still hiding in the body somewhere, directly damaging nerves or other parts of the body. Maybe the chronic presence of the virus, or remnants of the virus, keeps the immune system kind of simmering at a low boil, causing the symptoms. Maybe the virus is gone but left the immune system out of whack, so it’s now attacking the body. Or maybe there’s another cause.

“It’s still early days. But we believe that long COVID is not caused by one thing. That there are multiple diseases that are happening,” says Akiko Iwasaki, a professor of immunobiology at Yale University who is also studying long COVID-19.

But Iwasaki and others have started finding some tantalizing clues in the

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